Graviola - Soursop, Guanabana or Brazilian Paw Paw

Graviola Soursop Guanabana Muricata Annona

 

Graviola, also known as guanaba, Brazilina pawpaw and soursop, is the green, heart-shaped fruit from a tree found in the rain forests of South America and Southeast Asia. It is reputed to have a number of health benefits.

    More About Graviola 

    The flesh of the fruit consists of an edible white pulp and a core of indigestible black seeds. The species is the only member of its genus that is suitable for processing and preservation. The sweet pulp is used to make juice as well as candies, sorbets, and ice cream flavorings. In Mexico and Colombia, it is a common fruit, often used for dessert as the only ingredient, or as an agua fresca beverage, in Colombia it is a fruit for juices melting it with milk, latest researches at the National University of Colombia, confirm this fruit has a strong herbal potency. Ice cream and fruit bars made of soursop are also very popular. The seeds are normally left in the preparation, and removed while consuming. In Indonesia, dodol sirsak, a sweetmeat, is made by boiling soursop pulp in water and adding sugar until the mixture hardens. Soursop is also a common ingredient for making fresh fruit juices that are sold by street food vendors. In Vietnam, this fruit is used to make smoothies, or eaten as is. In Cambodia, this fruit is called "western custard-apple fruit." Popularly, it is eaten raw when it ripens. Usually the fruits are taken from the tree when they mature and left to ripen in a dark corner, whereby they will be eaten when they are fully ripe. It has a white flower with a very pleasing scent, especially in the morning. Nutritionally, the fruit is high in carbohydrates, particularly fructose. The fruit also contains significant amounts of vitamin C, vitamin B1, and vitamin B2. The fruit, seeds, and leaves have a number of herbal medicinal uses among indigenous peoples of regions where the plant is common.

    *Culled from scribd